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Strands Moment On The Boat


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#1
thelastpaul

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I thought that Strands brief story on the Abigail was one of the best FTWD/TWD universe moments ever. 

Seeing a man who has completely exhausted all his resources to survive thus far, and has come out on the shit end of the stick, only to be reunited with a broken piece of his dreams of survival was really cool. 

The talk with the astronaut did feel a little cheezy, but at the same time the acting made it feel believable enough. It was a cool bit of juxtaposition that placed me completely in the moment.

Just wanted to give this little moment in the show a nod. 


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"Tell my tale to those who ask. Tell it truly, the ill deeds along with the good, and let me be judged accordingly. The rest... is silence."


#2
ricky311

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Colman Domingo's amazing acting made this scene.

I also loved how this scene confirmed it was a worldwide epidemic and how the show uses that information not just as a nod to the fans, but as a way to take away what's left of the little hope Strand had at that point. Very similar to Rick finding out about everyone alive already being infected at the CDC, but better executed IMO. Especially because he delivered a baby earlier this season and that seemed to give him hope for a better future.

He has lost everything now. There's nothing left for him and by burning the Abigail, his last connection to Thomas and the old world, he pushed the ZA reset button, so it will be very interesting to see how his character will develop from here on out.

Maybe he will bump into Luciana somewhere and will learn about Madison and the ranch from her...
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#3
Aolain

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I agree. It was a "wonderful" scene. To be honest, I was hoping that he might get the Abigail up and running again.


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#4
mosher

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The scene hurt the pacing of the episode.

The talk with the cosmonaut was farfetched.

Finding the Abigail in the first place and then finding a rebirth was so cliche.

And I loved every bit of it.

A big credit to Domingo, who I honestly feel acts a bit too theatrically, especially in earlier seasons. He hit the notes perfectly and he made the whole thing work.

A great job by the writers, director, and Domingo for making a whole lot of questionable things work so very well. I loved the scene.


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#5
Serenity@sea

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His whole life, Strand has gotten away with conning others. Probably never working an honest days work in his life. Most people he used to get what he wanted rather than forming real relationships. Normally in a world like this, people like him would rise to the top because their moral center is already compromised, but it's not working for him because he is discovering his humanity.

 

I think the boat scene was profound for him because it brought him to his lowest point where he discovered that not only will he have to rely on himself (by working hard) to get by, he realized that that he doesn't want to be alone. He's slowly discovering that people aren't there to be used and discarded.

 

That said, I certainly don't think he is going to turn into Mother Teresa anytime soon. I expect him to rely on his wits and fall back on his old habits, yet he is slowly developing a conscience.


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#6
mosher

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His whole life, Strand has gotten away with conning others. Probably never working an honest days work in his life. Most people he used to get what he wanted rather than forming real relationships. Normally in a world like this, people like him would rise to the top because their moral center is already compromised, but it's not working for him because he is discovering his humanity.

 

I think the boat scene was profound for him because it brought him to his lowest point where he discovered that not only will he have to rely on himself (by working hard) to get by, he realized that that he doesn't want to be alone. He's slowly discovering that people aren't there to be used and discarded.

 

That said, I certainly don't think he is going to turn into Mother Teresa anytime soon. I expect him to rely on his wits and fall back on his old habits, yet he is slowly developing a conscience.

That's a great read on the character arc, and they seem to be approaching it well. 

I hated losing Nicholas just when he was starting to pull his wait, losing him compromised a great story potential and undermined Glenn's effort a bit. With Strand a similar opportunity is there, and of course pro  Strand is on another level entirely than amateur Nicholas.


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#7
Serenity@sea

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That's a great read on the character arc, and they seem to be approaching it well. 

I hated losing Nicholas just when he was starting to pull his wait, losing him compromised a great story potential and undermined Glenn's effort a bit. With Strand a similar opportunity is there, and of course pro  Strand is on another level entirely than amateur Nicholas.

The yacht, the champagne, the tuxedo jacket are the very representation of the finer things in life that Strand has always strived for. He was willing to get them by any means necessary. It certainly wasn't subtle symbolism, but Strand burning the boat shows his realization that those things are now meaningless in this world.


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#8
mosher

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The yacht, the champagne, the tuxedo jacket are the very representation of the finer things in life that Strand has always strived for. He was willing to get them by any means necessary. It certainly wasn't subtle symbolism, but Strand burning the boat shows his realization that those things are now meaningless in this world.

That's the odd thing. The whole segment was heavy handed, obvious, and cliche.

But Domingo and the team somehow made it really work for me. If I'd been told about it I'd have thought I'd hate it. My wife commented on the fire in his sunglasses shot. An over the top shot, and again it worked for both of us.

I guess when you get a bit artsy, you might as well go all in. They did and at least for me they nailed it.


Edited by mosher, 12 July 2017 - 08:20 PM.

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#9
Boota

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The fire in the sunglasses shot looked so cool that I didn't care that it made no sense to put on sunglasses in the dark. This scene was probably the fastest, most effective way to show Strand turning a corner. Every character needs an arc and the interesting thing about this show is that the characters arcs are crisscrossing each other in opposite directions. Strand is heading toward where Madison, the person who lived by civil rules, was at the beginning and Madison is heading toward where Strand started out when we met him. Nick is moving from feckless junkie to go-to guy. I'm really digging where they are taking these characters.


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"We went together like Kennedys and head wounds."--Lenny Kapowski, Mr. Undesirable

#10
theglassintheguvseye

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The yacht, the champagne, the tuxedo jacket are the very representation of the finer things in life that Strand has always strived for. He was willing to get them by any means necessary. It certainly wasn't subtle symbolism, but Strand burning the boat shows his realization that those things are now meaningless in this world.

I found that Dante's ? henchman rejecting his "gift" at the water source more poignant.  Still, I enjoyed the Abigail scene and agree w/ Boota as well.  The characters are getting better and better.  In the worst way in most cases which is natural.


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#11
mosher

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 In the worst way in most cases which is natural.

I like that narrative. I also liked Rick going mad, Shane going mad, etc. 

I can't imagine being thrust into a situation where everyone I care about has been/will be devoured by corpses and retaining my rational reasoning skills and universal empathy. Not without breaking occasionally. Then we get to watch how they respond to the breaks. There would be a lot of Tyreeses out there, a lot of Shane/Madisons, several Carols, and hopefully a lucky few of us might get to be a Glenn or Maggie. 

 


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#12
theglassintheguvseye

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I like that narrative. I also liked Rick going mad, Shane going mad, etc. 

I can't imagine being thrust into a situation where everyone I care about has been/will be devoured by corpses and retaining my rational reasoning skills and universal empathy. Not without breaking occasionally. Then we get to watch how they respond to the breaks. There would be a lot of Tyreeses out there, a lot of Shane/Madisons, several Carols, and hopefully a lucky few of us might get to be a Glenn or Maggie. 

 

Spot on, once again, Mosher.  Hell, it's hard in today's society to adhere to the niceties that are socially acceptable.  I've been through financial apocalypse, marital apocalypse and a whole lot of grief in my 45 years.  It wears on you even when there are good or safe times.  Constant pressure wears you down until a Grand Canyon of a psyche is forged.  If a semi normal middle aged gal or guy can relate to these folks, it's sad but imagine non stop threats.  No bueno.  Strand has lived a golden life and gained skills that do him absolutely no good in the ZA.  That's a difficult place to be.  It sucks to be of no use all of a sudden.


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#13
auximenes

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I really liked the boat scene. The conversation with the Russian on the space station I thought was a very interesting and original. The parallel between the Russian speaking from his 'grave' as he slowly ran out of time and burned up in the atmosphere and the 'lost Russian Cosmonaut' theories was great (https://en.wikipedia...Lost_Cosmonauts). The confirmation that the whole world has fallen was a deep moment.

 

Strand appears to have given up on his old life of high society and subterfuge and I think he's going to soon be killing some living humans instead of trying to weasel his way in or out.


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