The Walking Dead Season 4 Ep 6 - Live Bait

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What is your opinion of Ep. 6 Live Bait? (266 )

What is your opinion of Ep. 6 Live Bait?

  1. Excellent (88 [33.08%] - )

    33.08%

  2. Good - Some Critiques (68 [25.56%] - )

    25.56%

  3. Fair - Not What I Expected (69 [25.94%] - )

    25.94%

  4. Poor (41 [15.41%] - )

    15.41%

#301
aces07301

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The season finale was horrible. I hated the Governor episode and I hope they don't devote another hour on him. He is a narcissistic sociopath and he should have been killed off during last season's epic fail " Welcome to the Tombs". I am just saying enough already. He doesn't have one redeeming quality, he had Andrea killed, he killed the national guardsmen, stole their equipment, beheaded a bunch of people to put in fish tanks, and he kept his walking daughter alive until Michonne killed him and took out his eye. Now he's alone, on a vision quest, changes his name, takes care of a family and he is worthy of redemption? I don't think so. People say that he is like Rick in a sense he had to do awful things to survive, but Rick didn't keep a fish tank full of heads. Sorry, but there isn't even a bit of comparison.

I read the comics and I know the show is different, but why are they now bringing in the Kirkman novel "Rise of the Governor to tie in to the show?


I am waiting to see the Rick, Tyreese, Daryl, and Carol quadrangle to play out instead of wasting another hour of one eyed Willie/Philly and his gang of merry men who abandoned him. Finally I am still pissed that Andrea had to die, and we never got an Andrea Michonne backstory, how they survived. I wanted Andrea to end up with a nice guy and be happy for change.
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#302
Dr Cank

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I thought the episode was very good (almost excellent). As a strong advocate that the Guv is not just a "psycho"; I prefer to think the character is much more rounded than that. I liked how this episode humanized him. He is just another example of how a regular person responding to being placed in an irregular and extreme situation (e.g. The ZA).

I think many people are making a mistake in inferring The Guv's future chooses based on this episode. IMO in the next episode (or two) we will look back at this episode differently and see it as a cinderella episode for the Guv. This episode was depicted the Guv at his lowest state, he has lost everything and the writers went to great legnths to depict how he has nothing to live for. (the scene with the walker falling of the curb after the Guv's simple little dodge was awsome). At the end of the episode we see the fire in his eyes eye as he struggled to protect the safety of his new daughter.

With a revitalized desire to live, all the governor needs now to return to his furior postion is a group of men and women willing to do anything to survive in this damned world. (oh..., hello mister Martinez, what kind of guys have you been hanging out with?)

So. why not Excellent?:

Well I truly disliked the season 3 creation of: this episode we will follow this group and next episode we will follow the other group. I Loathed the return of this format. (having said that, it does add a bit of symetry to the whole Woodburry arc, so it is forgivable). There are calulated and benficial reasons for this format but there is one major down fall....

this brings me to my final point:

When are we? I understand the whole episode is in essence a flashback episode, (considering in the we paused our "typical" timeline with the Guvs right shoulder at the prison) but how far back are we? Do we have three days or three months before we see the Guv at the prison? I know future episodes will allude to a more defined timeline but not knowing when I am bugs the sh*t out of me.
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#303
kombat

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The whisky made him do all those awful things, he's sober now. Seriously though, we have all known people who were pretty much a different person after a few drinks. Take away the law, where only the strong survive, an unlimited amount of liquor and free time equals some crazy shit. I do have a question: Did Penny die before Woodbury or sometime after Woodbury was established?


novel spoiler

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#304
Dr Cank

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Oh and...

Food for thought:

Did The Guv's trail "go cold" because he stopped killing walkers during his exodus from Woodbury?


I thought the idea was a cool bridge between the two storylines.
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#305
kombat

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I thought the episode was very good (almost excellent). As a strong advocate that the Guv is not just a "psycho"; I prefer to think the character is much more rounded than that. I liked how this episode humanized him. He is just another example of how a regular person responding to being placed in an irregular and extreme situation (e.g. The ZA).

I think many people are making a mistake in inferring The Guv's future chooses based on this episode. IMO in the next episode (or two) we will look back at this episode differently and see it as a cinderella episode for the Guv. This episode was depicted the Guv at his lowest state, he has lost everything and the writers went to great legnths to depict how he has nothing to live for. (the scene with the walker falling of the curb after the Guv's simple little dodge was awsome). At the end of the episode we see the fire in his eyes eye as he struggled to protect the safety of his new daughter.

With a revitalized desire to live, all the governor needs now to return to his furior postion is a group of men and women willing to do anything to survive in this damned world. (oh..., hello mister Martinez, what kind of guys have you been hanging out with?)

So. why not Excellent?:

Well I truly disliked the season 3 creation of: this episode we will follow this group and next episode we will follow the other group. I Loathed the return of this format. (having said that, it does add a bit of symetry to the whole Woodburry arc, so it is forgivable). There are calulated and benficial reasons for this format but there is one major down fall....

this brings me to my final point:

When are we? I understand the whole episode is in essence a flashback episode, (considering in the we paused our "typical" timeline with the Guvs right shoulder at the prison) but how far back are we? Do we have three days or three months before we see the Guv at the prison? I know future episodes will allude to a more defined timeline but not knowing when I am bugs the sh*t out of me.


He told the girls he'd been on the road for a couple of months. I think the time jump between seasons was maybe 5-6 months they said on Talking Dead. So figure he lived with the girls for a few weeks before they left, I'm guessing we are still 2-3 months before where we see him standing outside the prison.
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#306
DeadInDetroit

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Also, I like the Lily character but wish she didn't have sex with the Governor. That was completely unnecessary.

Tara is so annoying. I hope she doesn't become part of Rick's group. For some reason I feel that she will.

I'm somewhat baffled at the decision to do 2 episodes in a row of just the Governor.


Unnecesary? Its been 3.5yrs since her husband left an at least 2yrs since shes even seen another man, besides her dad...although awkward to do next to the others, it was totally believable to me...
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#307
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I don't see how showing the Governor sans the "White Hat" Prison Party is manipulating the audience. I liked it provided prospective and explains why Woodbury did work under the Governor. It is just very easy for writers and fans to just be satisified with a broad stroked one-dimensional characters. Gimple is pistol whipping us, at least for now, with a human character, that yes might actually cause one to look back and go, maybe I understand why Andrea wasn't so quick to freak out , and why the good folks of Woodbury ended up under his authority. If anything Gimple is filling in some of the large potholes of incredibly shitty writing the show has had for the last 3 seasons.

Seeing negative reactions to challenging story plots/elements, makes me understand why we have dumb downed TV and Movies.

"Guv can't be nice guy, makes brain HURT!" LOL


No, Gimple is using a simplistic two step formula and calling it "character complexity." He's takes a real bastard and shows him doing something nice (the governor). He takes a kindly, maternalistic female and has her murder two people (Carol).

If there was an episode where Daryl fed puppies to walkers or Sacha practiced self- mutilation, would you finally start to see a lazy, repetitive pattern in the writing? Or would you just say that Daryl is now "multi-dimensional?"

I'm sorry but was this news to anybody? We already saw how easily he assimilated Tyreese and Sasha into Woodbury. We saw how two-faced he was during the beginning of Maggie's interrogation. We saw how he treated the soldier and tried to use tenderness to get him to reveal information. We saw how easily he rallied up Woodbury against Merle by using Red Scare tactics. We've seen it all. We get it. The guy is manipulative and tries to do nice deeds to gain the trust of others. This episode was not some epiphany. And it's symbolism was incredibly forced and cheesy. I really feel they should've stopped while they were ahead (Clear). That was a good episode. There was no need to mimic it. They recycled that exact formula (isolate the episode into one setting away from the previous, and temporarily shrink the main cast down for the sake of "character development"). It didn't fail because it's "The Guv". It failed because they reused that exact formula in hopes of lightning striking twice but instead we got bland results. I'm all for character development but the way they handled it was so predictable and ended up being really cheesy. And I'll say it again, I have a problem with them advertising the episode as if the Michonne/Governor rivalry was going to come full circle, but gave us something completely different. I'm resisting the urge to call it filler, I really am.

I just can't shake this feeling that I was watching Fist of the North Star this entire episode. Mute traumatized girl, mysterious guy shows up out of no where and becomes the savior and focuses on said girl, he beats up all the baddies like the invincible super hero he is...Ugh.


You're definitely onto something here.

The show has a tendency to repeat the same formulas and make the same points over and over,
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#308
General Ian Zane

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I'm not sure the govn'a isn't a psychopath.

My take on the last episode, combined with season 3 was :

He feels love for the daughter he lost. He is possessive of her. But his empathy only comes from his own internal wants and desires, such as a paternal instinct.

If someone was crying for help in front of him, his decision to help would be based on how he feels. The other person's cries would have no effect in most cases. That callousness is what really allows a psychopath to drift into whatever behavior they choose. But a young girl needing protection makes it through for him. Raping Maggie wouldn't make him feel bad. It wouldn't make him feel much of anything, other than maybe some power an some sexual energy. That's not normal, but it is psychopathic.

Whether he is dead inside, emotionally, is generally more often found is borderline personality disorders, which he seemed to break into at the end of season 3, but has now regressed from. He is ashamed of his borderline side, and burns his picture, etc. But he can't be ashamed of his psychopathic side. To him, being callous is just natural.

http://www.psychiatr...ng-psychopath-0

I'm hoping, for Megan's sake, that this more of Jekel and Hyde situation rather than a Frankenstein's monster scenario.

If he gets too stressed again.... its really bad.
A borderline psychopath is kind of a worst case scenario.
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#309
DHeav60

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Pretty convenient for the story line that the old man has been flush with oxygen since the outbreak, but runs out the day after Guv shows up?

Pretty convenient for the Guv to be thrust into a quest for more oxygen tanks, and he conveniently finds them without any major issues.

The family has been surviving since the outbreak on food from one truck? Seems to me that the random survivors are pretty helpless, despite living the in the ZA for more than year? That random couple that Rick and Carol ran into couldn't even deal with a single walker? Tara and Lilly are next to helpless. But it was very convenient for them to have a daughter who was roughly the age of Penny - what a "clever" way to connect w/ the Guv's 'humanity'....

My favorite "convenience" was Martinez and black goon #1 ditching Guv at the beginning......and then smacking right into them completely by chance at the end of the episode. These writers are either the lazy or completely untalented.... the more this season goes on it seems to be both.
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#310
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Pretty convenient for the story line that the old man has been flush with oxygen since the outbreak, but runs out the day after Guv shows up?

Pretty convenient for the Guv to be thrust into a quest for more oxygen tanks, and he conveniently finds them without any major issues.

The family has been surviving since the outbreak on food from one truck? Seems to me that the random survivors are pretty helpless, despite living the in the ZA for more than year? That random couple that Rick and Carol ran into couldn't even deal with a single walker? Tara and Lilly are next to helpless. But it was very convenient for them to have a daughter who was roughly the age of Penny - what a "clever" way to connect w/ the Guv's 'humanity'....

My favorite "convenience" was Martinez and black goon #1 ditching Guv at the beginning......and then smacking right into them completely by chance at the end of the episode. These writers are either the lazy or completely untalented.... the more this season goes on it seems to be both.


It was also hard to believe that the Dad could survive 1 1/2 years with cancer (or however long it was) without any treatment and then he dies right when the Gov shows up.
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#311
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I don't see how showing the Governor sans the "White Hat" Prison Party is manipulating the audience. I liked it provided prospective and explains why Woodbury did work under the Governor. It is just very easy for writers and fans to just be satisified with a broad stroked one-dimensional characters. Gimple is pistol whipping us, at least for now, with a human character, that yes might actually cause one to look back and go, maybe I understand why Andrea wasn't so quick to freak out , and why the good folks of Woodbury ended up under his authority. If anything Gimple is filling in some of the large potholes of incredibly shitty writing the show has had for the last 3 seasons.

Seeing negative reactions to challenging story plots/elements, makes me understand why we have dumb downed TV and Movies.

"Guv can't be nice guy, makes brain HURT!" LOL


There is really no need to be condescending about it. I fully grasped where they were going with the Guv, I just didn't care for it.
I'm fairly certain that Gimple knew he was taking a risk with this episode and IMO, it didn't work.
For one, I thought the Guv's story should have played out last season. I'm not invested in his character, so it should go without saying that I wouldn't care for an entire episode based on him.
I also thought that they should have at least checked in with the prison. I can follow two concurrent storylines at once. At this point, there are few storylines up in the air and instead of creating suspense, it can start to feel like certain things are fizzling out.
Even if briefly we were shown the fallout of Rick decision to banish Carol with Tyreese and Daryl, we would know that there is a lot of tension currently at the prison, not just wonder if it will be anti-climatic.
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#312
Howard Roark

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They didn't have to go this route with the governor. They should have left the serious character development to team prison, while giving an abbreviated story to the governor. Could have been told in first 20 minutes of episode six. Governor runs into a nasty group of road bandits who spare his life when he tells them about the prison. The goons show the governor their giant weapons cache, governor says "we can take the prison easy with this stuff." Then we cut back to team prison, and don't see governor again until him and his heavily armed goons show up on Rick's doorstep. Not exactly like that, but something along those lines.

No. Just............no. We would all, quite rightly, be screaming in ALL CAPS on here about what a terrible piece of hack-writing they were churning out for the episode if they had gone the route you just outlined above. What they chose to do was infinitely better than that.
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#313
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I dunno, I watched it a second time, and while it's still not my favorite, I have a less dim view of it now.

The chess scene between the governor and the little girl is the key secene that shows what the episode is really all about.

"You can lose pawns and still win the game," says the governor.

"This is the king. He's the one you want to capture."

He's still thinking about team prison and is still at war with them.

It made me see this episode differently. It's not about the governor's redemption and he's still evil as ever because people are just pawns to him, including the family that he is living with currently. The prospect of a safe refuge (the prison) is something he can use to manipulate Lilly and whoever else he runs into like pawns on a chess board. The war between Woodbury and team prison is still going on even now, at least in he governor's mind. Every move he's making seems to be part of his end game, which is killing Rick and the prison group. Rather than a standalone episode about the governor, I see it as part of "the chess game" between Rick and the governor.

On one hand it looks as though they were trying to add layers to the Governor.

However. his redeeming qualities may not be real or sincere, but just tools to manipulate people in order to carry out his endgame.
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#314
Officer_Friendly

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Can somebody explain what the Governor should have been like with those people to make it more realistic? Sometimes bad people do good things, and vice versa. I just have a hard time understanding why the Governor's actions seemed so "out of character." Ted Bundy, on death row, worked with authorities to help catch the Green River Killer. John Wayne Gacy dressed up as a clown to entertain children at birthday parties. You could argue that such acts by evil men are "out of character" but it shows that even in real life, bad people can repress their evil and do good things. That's the thing about psychopaths; they are completely unpredictable.

I don't find it unrealistic or out of character at all with the Governor's actions in this episode. I feel like he believes all of the bad things he's done in the past were for a reason. Everything was done to protect Woodbury and the people there. Killing people like the guardsmen and attempting to kill Michonne, for example, was done because they were liabilities who could potentially threaten the safety of Woodbury. He obviously crossed the line when he slaughtered his own followers, but if you remember that scene, Philip was practically going insane. He just snapped and completely lost it at that moment, but he's had a lot of time to reflect on that all by himself. Because they've introduced a split personality gimmick for the Governor, having him adapt a new alias and deny that he was the Governor, perhaps that shows that he feels ashamed of that person and doesn't want to be him anymore.
Personally I think it's kind of a Jeckel and Hyde thing where he is trying to be a good person, but he still has that evil lurking within him that only needs a trigger to be unleashed.

I don't know if people were expecting the Governor to straight up butcher the family in the apartment as soon as he saw them, but in my opinion that'd be much more senseless. The first one he saw was a little girl that reminded him of his own child, who was the most important thing in the world to him. Why would he then want to attack them? Even if he didn't attack the little girl, why kill or harm her family? Because he did things like get that game for the girl, we know he was just wanting to make her happy, so why would it make any sense for him to hurt any of them?

I enjoyed this episode even more after a rewatch. I rate it 'Excellent'. I wasn't the biggest fan of the Governor last season because of the way he was handled but I found this episode to be an entertaining exploration of his character.

Brilliantly said. +1
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#315
Howard Roark

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Oh, just wanted to mention also that upon first viewing last Sunday night I took the title "Live Bait" to be referring to the new family he encounters, as they are ripe for manipulation due to being ignorant of his past. The King stumbled upon some new pawns he can use, so to speak. What are pawns on a chess board other than bait? The things people have mentioned since made me feel like maybe I missed the obvious, such as the "live bait" sign when they ran across the mini-herd and the fact that he's ending the episode trapped in an open pit with Megan as they could tie into that title also. I still prefer my initial suspicion on the issue, though. B)
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#316
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I dunno, I watched it a second time, and while it's still not my favorite, I have a less dim view of it now.

The chess scene between the governor and the little girl is the key secene that shows what the episode is really all about.

"You can lose pawns and still win the game," says the governor.

"This is the king. He's the one you want to capture."

He's still thinking about team prison and is still at war with them.

It made me see this episode differently. It's not about the governor's redemption and he's still evil as ever because people are just pawns to him, including the family that he is living with currently. The prospect of a safe refuge (the prison) is something he can use to manipulate Lilly and whoever else he runs into like pawns on a chess board. The war between Woodbury and team prison is still going on even now, at least in he governor's mind. Every move he's making seems to be part of his end game, which is killing Rick and the prison group. Rather than a standalone episode about the governor, I see it as part of "the chess game" between Rick and the governor.

On one hand it looks as though they were trying to add layers to the Governor.

However. his redeeming qualities may not be real or sincere, but just tools to manipulate people in order to carry out his endgame.


+1

He cannot attack the prison on his own; he needs an "army". And the only way he can get a group of survivors (not bandits) to be willing to attack the prison is telling them "we will be safe in there, but the people inside are the monsters that destroyed my previous community, and they will kill us and take our stuff if they know about us"


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#317
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I'm not seeing how he's going to keep living as Brian Hariot (that's how it was spelt on the barn, right?) now that he's run back into Martinez (and Shumpert? lol). Megan is with him, and presumably Tara and Lilly as well, although it kinda looked like they lost them because Tara sprains her ankle, and Lilly lags back to help her keep up and I don't remember seeing them again after it showed Brian run ahead and fall in the hole with Megan soon thereafter. Have to re-watch, not sure if I'm missing anything there, but I got the impression that we might not see Tara and Lilly fall into the group that Brian and Megan are looking like becoming a part of. I'm guessing Tara and Lilly immediately run into emissaries of Team Sick Ward, going by this show's history thus far. It's like the entire universe only spans a 3-mile sphere in Georgia sometimes in this show. ^_^
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#318
cbird4

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I'm not sure the govn'a isn't a psychopath.

My take on the last episode, combined with season 3 was :

He feels love for the daughter he lost. He is possessive of her. But his empathy only comes from his own internal wants and desires, such as a paternal instinct.

If someone was crying for help in front of him, his decision to help would be based on how he feels. The other person's cries would have no effect in most cases. That callousness is what really allows a psychopath to drift into whatever behavior they choose. But a young girl needing protection makes it through for him. Raping Maggie wouldn't make him feel bad. It wouldn't make him feel much of anything, other than maybe some power an some sexual energy. That's not normal, but it is psychopathic.

Whether he is dead inside, emotionally, is generally more often found is borderline personality disorders, which he seemed to break into at the end of season 3, but has now regressed from. He is ashamed of his borderline side, and burns his picture, etc. But he can't be ashamed of his psychopathic side. To him, being callous is just natural.

http://www.psychiatr...ng-psychopath-0

I'm hoping, for Megan's sake, that this more of Jekel and Hyde situation rather than a Frankenstein's monster scenario.

If he gets too stressed again.... its really bad.
A borderline psychopath is kind of a worst case scenario.


TG definitely does not have borderline personality disorder. A common trait among those with that disorder is a tendency, even desire, to cut and hurt themselves physically. I haven't seen a hint of that attitude in TG.
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#319
DHeav60

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It was also hard to believe that the Dad could survive 1 1/2 years with cancer (or however long it was) without any treatment and then he dies right when the Gov shows up.


It's also conveniently ridiculous that Tara sprains her ankle mere seconds before they stumble onto a herd of walkers. Obviously, this is an extremely cheap way to heighten the tension, and has been used to the extreme in the horror genre. You'd THINK that writers of a highly rated AMC show wouldn't stoop to that level.... but everything about this series is either lazy or clumsy.
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#320
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It was also hard to believe that the Dad could survive 1 1/2 years with cancer (or however long it was) without any treatment and then he dies right when the Gov shows up.

And the group was living in that apartment building? So, Rick's group has to fight tooth and nail to get in a prison and fight tooth and nail to STAY in the prison, but apparently any group that finds an apartment building can live their for over a year. So stupid

Also like to point out that you are dominating this thread
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Imagine a group of a hundred motorcycles driving down a freeway. Eventually, they hit a junction. One road goes northwest and the other goes northeast. So one guy, we'll call him S, says, "Let's go northwest!" A mile past the intersection, a semi careens into the group and kills ninety of them. Ten are wounded, but they survive and keep going. Eventually, they hit 10,000 miles. S suddenly has his consciousness thrown into his past body right before the junction. Now, he says, "Let's go northeast!" All 100 bikers survive. Happily ever after, right? But what about the ten, no nine, who went northwest and survived? What happens to the reality they were living? Does it just disappear now that S has changed the past? It's not like only bad things happened on that 10,000 mile journey. Maybe one of them fell in love with a gas station attendant and got her pregnant or maybe one adopted a homeless kid that joined the adventure. That 10,000 mile journey would be full of stories. Romances, farewells, friendships...the loss of those ninety lives is horrible and unfortunate, but what would rewriting their history mean? The nine who survived lived full lives and did the best they could with the hand they were dealt. How could it be right to just erase all that? Isn't that worth something? Is there a point to a world where everything is happy? Are people who struggle for a better life just idiots? Being human is about fighting even when it seems hopeless and finding happiness in a world that hates it. Are you saying that's worthless?


#321
Deadpelican

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+1

He cannot attack the prison on his own; he needs an "army". And the only way he can get a group of survivors (not bandits) to be willing to attack the prison is telling them "we will be safe in there, but the people inside are the monsters that destroyed my previous community, and they will kill us and take our stuff if they know about us"


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I was bored watching it the first time and didn't catch the subtext of the scene. The second time I watched it, I realized that he was talking about the war between Woodbury and the Prison, he's still planning to get back at them, and everything that happens in the episode is the very early stages of the governor's revenge plot.

I still don't think it was a particularly great episode but I guess I'd rate it "fair" instead of "poor" now.
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#322
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And the group was living in that apartment building? So, Rick's group has to fight tooth and nail to get in a prison and fight tooth and nail to STAY in the prison, but apparently any group that finds an apartment building can live their for over a year. So stupid


Apartments in TWD world seem to be awesome ways to hold up, it worked for Morgan (though admittedly HIS building was a lot cooler than the Chambler's digs). Throw a couple spike traps with live rats as bait and you're all set for several years, apparently. :lol:
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#323
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It's also conveniently ridiculous that Tara sprains her ankle mere seconds before they stumble onto a herd of walkers. Obviously, this is an extremely cheap way to heighten the tension, and has been used to the extreme in the horror genre. You'd THINK that writers of a highly rated AMC show wouldn't stoop to that level.... but everything about this series is either lazy or clumsy.

What bothered me more about that scene was the way the Guv kept calling out for Megan to come to him, rather than running up to her and grabbing her. Yes, we get it. Megan chose the Guv. She trusts him. :zombirolleye:
I don't agree that everything is lazy or clumsy. For the most part, I like the direction they are taking this season. I'm just hoping that this will be my least favorite episode of the season.

And the group was living in that apartment building? So, Rick's group has to fight tooth and nail to get in a prison and fight tooth and nail to STAY in the prison, but apparently any group that finds an apartment building can live their for over a year. So stupid

Also like to point out that you are dominating this thread


I'd think the opposite is true since I don't think many agree with me, but thank you anyway. :D
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#324
Deadpelican

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No. Just............no. We would all, quite rightly, be screaming in ALL CAPS on here about what a terrible piece of hack-writing they were churning out for the episode if they had gone the route you just outlined above. What they chose to do was infinitely better than that.


As slow, dull, monotonous grind focusing on the minutiae of a character that the most of us loathe, while leaving the prison with several unresolved conflicts?

Yeah.

Way better.
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#325
ZombieDoubleRainbow

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I dunno, I watched it a second time, and while it's still not my favorite, I have a less dim view of it now.

The chess scene between the governor and the little girl is the key secene that shows what the episode is really all about.

"You can lose pawns and still win the game," says the governor.

"This is the king. He's the one you want to capture."

He's still thinking about team prison and is still at war with them.

It made me see this episode differently. It's not about the governor's redemption and he's still evil as ever because people are just pawns to him, including the family that he is living with currently. The prospect of a safe refuge (the prison) is something he can use to manipulate Lilly and whoever else he runs into like pawns on a chess board. The war between Woodbury and team prison is still going on even now, at least in he governor's mind. Every move he's making seems to be part of his end game, which is killing Rick and the prison group. Rather than a standalone episode about the governor, I see it as part of "the chess game" between Rick and the governor.

On one hand it looks as though they were trying to add layers to the Governor.

However. his redeeming qualities may not be real or sincere, but just tools to manipulate people in order to carry out his endgame.


I haven't posted in here yet (I have a bad habit of lurking) but as I was reading I was a little amazed most didn't really catch the significance of the chess scene. That conversation displays exactly where the Governor's mindset is. He hasn't forgotten the Prison, or his war. He's looking for more pawns, rethinking his strategy now that he's regrouped at that apartment. All his redemption is completely self serving - for both his war, and his desire for a "new Penny". Everything he did was to make Megan happy, getting them to leave (and thus make himself look reluctant by not telling them the world is way more dangerous and they had a good thing there) was for new pawns.
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